A study that tested photic stimulation for reduction of poor behavior in ADHD children found that 15 sessions of photic stimulation between 12 Hz and 14 Hz resulted in behavioral change. This behavioral change was measured using the Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist – which accounted for not only the parent’s perspective, but self-reports from the children. Statistically it was stated that behavior improved up to 70% in the stimulation group compared to controls.
Monaural beats have similarities to binaural beats, but the two separate frequencies are delivered through a pulse pattern and mixed before they reach the listeners ears, resulting in the advantage of being audible without stereo headphones. However, using stereo headphones intensifies the effectiveness of monaural beats and is recommended for the best effect. 
  It's like gaining a new level of clarity... understanding.... wisdom. When you're able to artistically and logically render solutions to problems... when you can objectively and subjectively evaluate opportunities and their innate qualities... when you can read people and empathetically understand them... you're given a foresight that others simply lack.

You may already have a good feel for where each of the different brainwave states takes you, and know intuitively what will work for you the best on a day-to-day basis with your meditation practice. If you are a little fuzzy about the differences between the brainwave states, however, and would like to have a really clear, visceral sense of what each state does for you and how they resonate with you physically, mentally, and emotionally, one way you can find out is to listen to Harmonic … [Read more...]
In fact, you can use an audio, as a beginner, that takes your brain to the same places that have been recorded in the brains of 30-year monastic Buddhist monks. When you start doing this, you begin to play around with “benefits” and “effects” that lie solely in the realm of consciousness itself. These benefits are also profound, yet not measurable or provable except through your own subjective experience.
Every NeuralSync™ audio is recorded with full-range frequency sweeps that cycle rhythmically throughout the entire audio. The dynamics of the sweep are then additionally enhanced with simultaneous left-to-right channel crossing. Because of this augmentation, the effects are multiplied, the intensity is amplified and the brain is drawn into the mental state more consistently and powerfully than with the static methods of other protocols.
The authors concluded that preliminary evidence suggested that brainwave entrapment was an effective therapeutic tool, but further research was required. The evidence presented appeared to justify the recommendation for further research. In view of the lack of controlled evidence and problems with methodology and reporting in the review, the authors’ conclusions regarding efficacy did not appear reliable.
* We made the decision in this update to return Brain Wave to a Portrait-Only App. We know some people will miss the Landscape UI, but we did this to focus on the Brainwave Entrainment and Audio experience, and to prepare for new devices and screen sizes. Maintaining and testing portrait and landscape layouts for iOS 5-8, HD&SD, and 3 Aspect Ratios had become the single most time consuming part of our development and testing, and soon there will be even more. 90% of our dev and testing time was spent tilting iPads and iPhones of different sizes and different iOS versions, tweaking code that had nothing to do with brainwave entrainment--the reason I and others use this app everyday. Once the new Aspect Ratio devices come out and we have time to test with them, then maybe Landscape will make a comeback on the iPad.
Jump up ^ Trost W. and Vuilleumier P., Rhythmic entrainment as a mechanism for emotion induction by music: a neurophysiological perspective. In The Emotional Power of Music: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Musical Arousal, Expression, and Social Control, Cochrane T., Fantini B., and Scherer K. R., (Eds.), Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press; 2013, pp213–225.
The mechanism for this is that when your eyes or ears are exposed to a particular frequency of pulses or beats, the thalamus first distributes this information to the entire brain, including the visual and cerebral cortex where neural activity begins to synchronize to the incoming frequency, producing hemispheric synchronization and a balance of brainwave activity across the brain.
While binaural beats are the most common technique we use for producing brainwave entrainment music, we do use other brainwave entrainment techniques such as isochronic tones, monaural beats and amplitude modulation. If these techniques have been used then you will find them mentioned in the written description of the music productions that include them. If not mentioned, then you can assume that binaural beats are the only brainwave entrainment technology in use.
Your brain operates at certain levels of activity – the normal waking, active Beta, the meditative Alpha, the asleep-and-dreaming or deep meditative Theta, and the deep sleep/unconscious Delta. Beta is characterized by one thing we all want to get away from – stress.But that brainwave state has its place. It’s the action mode, and that’s the way it should be! If we’re not alert when we’re awake, bad things can happen, right?

Our brains follow cues from outside stimuli, and brainwaves mimic the pulse rates of the sounds we expose it to. So, by creating tracks that pulse sound waves at a desired frequency, we can effectively coax our brain into that state. In layman's terms; by listening to some strange sounding brainwave frequency audios, we can literally slip our brain into a state of feeling calm, alert, focused, energized... and the list goes on. Pretty cool, right!?

Gamma waves are the most recently discovered brainwave, a discovery made possible by digital EEG technology. Gamma is associated with the integration of information from different areas of the brain, and having a good memory is associated with having a certain baseline of 40 hertz gamma activity. Low gamma activity is associated with learning disabilities and poor memory.


The reason I am telling you this is to consider that it is critical for you to seek advice from sources that have wide-spreading experience with brainwave entrainment. Having personally used the technology for over 13 years, in combination with many other more ‘traditional’ methods such as yoga, meditation, visualizations, positive affirmations, NLP, etc., I believe that my personal experiences and the in-depth research I have conducted in order to make sure I approach this safely, can serve as a good starting point for you.

Going back to the technology, the simple claim of brainwave entrainment is that, by listening to these audios, usually with stereo headphones and eyes closed, your brain will be naturally and effortlessly led into a specific brainwave state as designated by the maker of the audio (ie: it could be alpha, theta, delta, gamma, etc., depending on what the audio is designed to do.)  The other most basic claim is that when listening to these audios, the right and left hemispheres of the brain synchronize and you experience whole-brain functioning.
hey thanks for wonderful ideas you posted. am kinda new to this whole idea and i was wondering if you could tell me with what types of audio tracks should i begin with. or if you could suggest some trusted and effective you tube videos, i would appreciate it. guys i will post my experiences when i have tried this thing. Thank you very much for your help Maya.
So, what is binaural beats or binaural tones?  They are auditory (hearing) processing artifacts, or apparent sounds, caused by specific physical stimuli.  This effect was discovered in 1839 by Heinrich Wilhelm Dove and earned greater public awareness in the late 20th century based on claims coming from the alternative medicine community that binaural beats could help induce relaxation, meditation, creativity and other desirable mental states. The effect on the brainwaves depends on the difference in frequencies of each tone: for example, if 300 Hz was played in one ear and 310 in the other, then the binaural beat would have a frequency of 10 Hz.
With regard to that, I would like to tell you a story about GMO. I recently explored a case study about GMO products, which explained how initial research showed no negative effects were caused by GMO products. A group of French scientists, however, decided to gather a research group and examine more closely  its effects by prolonging the study for up to four years. What they discovered was that although no initial side effects were seen in the tested animals, after the third year of the study, the ones that were fed with genetically-modified foods started developing tumors that affected more than 1/3 of their bodies.

I personally have been experimenting with binaural beats – both in and out of the float tank – for the past year or so and they have quickly and easily become one of my favourite go-to “hacks” for helping me achieve a desired state of being. From listening to a specific track right before going to sleep which helps put my mind and body in a state of relaxation and recovery to, on the flip-side, listening to a track that helps prime my brain-state for creativity and focus right before I sit down to do some work – like writing this blog! They are also an enjoyable and effective asset to try out and experiment with while in the float tank. For the reasons mentioned above, as well as the sound frequencies can resonate a subtle but noticeable vibration in the tank, water and your body making for quite the unique floating experience!
Neural oscillations are rhythmic or repetitive electrochemical activity in the brain and central nervous system. Such oscillations can be characterized by their frequency, amplitude and phase. Neural tissue can generate oscillatory activity driven by mechanisms within individual neurons, as well as by interactions between them. They may also adjust frequency to synchronize with the periodic vibration of external acoustic or visual stimuli.[3]
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