Yes, brainwave entrainment is based upon science. It has been scientifically proven to work, and to benefit the brain in all kinds of amazing ways. Yes people use things like EEG machines to read how it works on the brain. BUT, this does not mean it is overly complicated, and it does not mean that you have to be overly techy or scientific, or have any experience in neurology at all to create a brainwave entrainment audio or understand how it works.
Maya Mendoza is a published author of 3 personal development books. She has run an NLP / EFT Practice for 29 years helping clients transform problems into personal power. Maya is also a accomplished copywriter and well known Digital Marketing & Social Social Media Strategist - Specializing in Google+ for business. She was named "best marketing consultant" in Glasgow, UK in 2013.  
That is a general assumption people make but there isn’t really much science to back it up. What we do know though is that isochronic tones are ineffective below 4hz, and possibly a bit higher. So for theta and delta entrainment you are best off with binaural beats. In my experience binaural beats will be very effective all the way up to around 40hz.

Recent research at the University of Lisbon finally uncovered the reason for the 350 year-old mystery, finding that the resonance of sound is the mechanism for entrainment of swinging pendulums and ticking clocks, and it seems likely that the energy transferred by sound is also responsible for other observations of entrainment, including brainwave entrainment.


You also may find that after pushing yourself really hard, now you have pushed yourself a little too much, and you’re getting into overwhelm. You may want to ride that overwhelm like a wave to where it’s pushing you just a little bit, but not so much that it will push you over the edge and have you take a dive. So, maybe on Saturday, after pushing hard all week, you might decide to put on the releasing tracks. In this way, you can still experience a very deep and blissful meditation, but without all the push from the carrier frequencies and the biofield amplitude.
A study published in Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology by Paul Williams and Michael West in 1975 examined the brainwave states of people experienced in meditation while using photic stimulation, and another study by Leonard, Telch, and Harrington in 1999 examined the successful use of brainwave entrainment techniques for attaining meditative states in subjects.
The activity of neurons generate electric currents; and the synchronous action of neural ensembles in the cerebral cortex, comprising large numbers of neurons, produce macroscopic oscillations. These phenomena can be monitored and graphically documented by an electroencephalogram (EEG). The electroencephalographic representations of those oscillations are typically denoted by the term 'brainwaves' in common parlance.[4][5]
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