According to both observation and research, after a series of brainwave entrainment practices, the brain learns how to state change. This enables you to achieve certain brainwave effects in the absence of entertainment. Additionally, research shows that children are usually in the Theta stage and this in itself could provide a detailed explanation for their ability to learn fast and remember what they have learned. We can take advantage of this effect and use Alpha and Theta waves to reduce learning time in adults.

You may already have a good feel for where each of the different brainwave states takes you, and know intuitively what will work for you the best on a day-to-day basis with your meditation practice. If you are a little fuzzy about the differences between the brainwave states, however, and would like to have a really clear, visceral sense of what each state does for you and how they resonate with you physically, mentally, and emotionally, one way you can find out is to listen to Harmonic … [Read more...]


I can offer a hypothetical--however do not know know practical it will turn out to be. There is a fair amonut of bad science on this topic on you tube. The gamma wave frequency is associated with attentional focus and arguably a unified sense of self. If it could be entrained it should lead to a meditative focus-like exceptionally well-trained meditators. Some but not all studies on meditating Buddhist monks suggest this is so. Does this really and more generally occur--I will say there is nothing lost in trying--we all go into a 40Hz range on occasion without ill effect-- but I would not put confidence in the purported methods out there at present. Good luck.

With digital upgrades, Berger’s machine is still in use today, known as an electroencephalography machine, or EEG. Berger used his machine to study the brains of psychologically normal and abnormal people and discovered the first brainwave, called the alpha wave and also known as the Berger wave, along with the faster beta wave, which he observed suppressing the alpha wave when subjects opened their closed eyes. 
The functional role of neural oscillations is still not fully understood;[6] however they have been shown to correlate with emotional responses, motor control, and a number of cognitive functions including information transfer, perception, and memory.[7][8][9] Specifically, neural oscillations, in particular theta activity, are extensively linked to memory function, and coupling between theta and gamma activity is considered to be vital for memory functions, including episodic memory.[10][11][12]
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