The Alpha waves have for years been the most popular frequencies to use during Brainwave Entrainment. They have the ability to enhance light relaxation as well as positive thinking and they are often utilized for enhancing what is known as ‘super learning ability’. The Beta waves have a frequency of 13-25 Hz and they assist in enhancing a standard state of alertness. In addition, they are an effective remedy for both stress and anxiety.
Discovered by Austrian Psychiatrist Hans Berger in 1908, Alpha brainwaves cycle 8 to 13 times per second, a good bit slower than beta brainwaves. While considered a part of a group of brainwaves, the Alpha brainwave has one distinct trait that makes it stand out from its siblings – it appears and disappears while going through our brain. Sometimes alpha waves are present, sometimes they are not. The disappearance of the Alpha brainwave usually occurs when someone is asleep or experiences heightened emotions such as fear or anger. This brainwave only appears whenever a person is awake and relaxed, a one-of-a-kind distinction among other types of brainwaves. 
So let’s start with the basics, and we can move on from there. An easier way to understand brainwave entrainment would be to think about how your brain gets entrained in real life, without the use of any technology. Have you ever heard a song on the radio that stuck into your mind throughout the day and maybe even the next one? Now think about a repeating sound, like the ticking of a clock – simply listening to it your brain starts producing alpha waves that match that tick-tack sound. Or have you ever been at a meeting when you immediately felt sleepy? That is because the majority of people in the room were feeling that same way and your brain simply matched the brain wave patterns they have been emanating. We can go on exemplifying this phenomenon, but the main point is that our brain is altering and adapting in direct response to what we hear, think, and see.
Controlled or pre/post studies of the effects of BWE using auditory or visual stimulation were eligible for inclusion, provided pulses of light or tone were delivered at frequencies hypothesised to have a beneficial effect or in line with a protocol addressing clinical outcomes. Studies were required to report clinical or psychological outcomes (measured using standard methods or as deemed appropriate by peer review) and to report statistical analysis. Studies of outcomes such as electroencephalogram (EEG) response or neurotransmitter levels were not eligible. Case studies were excluded.
Insomnia and PTSD for most of my life are real bears that I wrestle with every night. A brain neural-therapist (for lack of a better description) said that this kind of sound recording may help. It is not music. When I remember to play the disc, I fall asleep within the first 5-8 minutes. One day I played the disc while cleaning and I was very surprised to hear how much of the recording I never recall hearing before. That's why I know how long it takes to fall asleep.

The objectives and inclusion criteria of the review were clear. Relevant sources were searched for studies, although the restriction to published studies in English meant that the review was prone to publication and language biases. The authors did not state whether steps were taken to minimise the risk of bias and error in the processes of study selection and data extraction (for example, by having more than one reviewer independently make decisions). The authors mentioned which studies were blinded, but it did not appear that study validity was systematically assessed, which made it difficult to judge the reliability of the review findings. The decision to combine studies by narrative synthesis appeared appropriate given the strong clinical heterogeneity between the studies, but the authors failed to quantify the size or statistical significance of the findings reported. The evidence presented appeared to justify the authors’ conclusions that further research was justified, but in view of the dearth of good-quality evidence and problems with methodology and reporting in the review, the conclusions regarding efficacy did not appear reliable.


Behavior problems: In two separate studies with a total of 57 children, it was found that brainwave entrainment was able to significantly improve behavior problems. One of these studies was conducted on children with ADHD and determined that they significantly improved not only in regards to attention deficits, but also in their behavior. Both parents and teachers reported statistically significant improvements in how the children behaved.
“A light sound machine is a brainwave entrainment tool.  Using sound (headphones) & light (strobe light goggles) stimulation, listeners are gently guided into specific brainwave states. Each audio beat and pulse is a specific frequency. Our minds ‘think’ in terms of frequency. Brainwaves change frequencies based on neural activity within the brain. Hearing and vision are considered the favorable senses for affecting brainwaves safely. By presenting beats and pulses to the brain, the brain begins to mimic or follow the same frequencies. This process is referred to as entrainment. In essence, these instruments speak to the mind in it’s own language – the language of frequency.”
Miscellaneous reports have also been made about the advantages of brainwave entrainment with the reviews of numerous users stating that the it can assist in increasing sex drive. Research shows that relaxation, meditation, and good self esteem ensures normal body functions. Furthermore, the brainwave entertainment allows your body to flow in rhythm with the beats therefore if your brain accepts and blends with certain frequencies, this could account for the enhanced sex drive.
1. Compressed formats like MP3 do not retain the sound quality necessary for the brain to fully achieve brainwave synchronization – and are too inferior to effectively deliver even binaural beats downloads or isochronic tones properly, much less something as powerful as NeuralSync™. Our lossless audio entrains at the precise level guaranteed to induce the most potent response.
Many people experienced in using alpha brainwave entrainment report that the state of mind associated with alpha waves is a time when they feel most consciously connected to their subconscious mind. The intense experience of hypnagogic sleep, reported by some people as a feeling of being awake and asleep at the same time, is also associated with alpha brainwaves.
John and Doug talk about iAwake Technologies' new track developed by Doug Prater himself, Stealing Flow - a tool which can help you become your best self. They also discuss Stealing Fire, the book which was the inspiration for Stealing Flow. John also talks about depression and how to overcome it through finding your path and your purpose - and how being in flow states facilitates that. … [Read more...]
Hi Et, In all the feedback and studies I’ve read and looked into over the years, I’ve seen lots of feedback from people talking about how they don’t like the sound of the tones, or they find them irritating in some way. Unfortunately, there doesn’t seem to be any particular reason why one person likes it and the next doesn’t. It’s a bit like normal music, one person’s sweet symphony is another person pneumatic drill. It’s common for people to find it weird and maybe annoying at first, which is how I felt in the beginning. But usually after a few listens you can start to get used to it and appreciate the sound, and especially the feeling it gives you. Personally, I think it can help if you try to embrace the sound, psychologically speaking beforehand. It can also help to have the sound playing at a very low volume, to begin with, then building it up as you get more used to it.
The functional role of neural oscillations is still not fully understood;[6] however they have been shown to correlate with emotional responses, motor control, and a number of cognitive functions including information transfer, perception, and memory.[7][8][9] Specifically, neural oscillations, in particular theta activity, are extensively linked to memory function, and coupling between theta and gamma activity is considered to be vital for memory functions, including episodic memory.[10][11][12]
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