The pitch frequency measures and describes what a beat sounds like, i.e. does the isochronic beat have a deeper bass sound, or is it high pitched and sharper sounding? The beat waveform frequency describes how many times the beat is repeating per second, i.e. how fast it is beating. You don’t really need to concern yourself about the pitch frequency, as that doesn’t have a direct influence on brainwave entrainment and doesn’t play a part on the measurement on an EEG. I only mentioned it because you were referring to humans not being able to hear below 20Hz. I change the pitch frequency just to suit the mood of the track. For tracks that are to be relaxing, for meditation or sleep, I tend to use a lower pitch frequency so it sounds deeper and more relaxing and I never have that lower than 100Hz. For an energizing, high focus track I might use a more higher pitched 200Hz isochronic tone, because that is sharper sounding and less likely to make you feel sleepy. That’s all you really need to know about the pitch frequency.
Delta brainwaves, resonating at 1Hz-4Hz, usually only occur in the deeper levels of sleep. It is even uncommon to access Delta brainwaves through meditation, unless one is very advanced, or is using brainwave entrainment. Even while using brainwave entrainment technology, it will take some mental training and practice to be able to maintain conscious awareness and not fall asleep.
Beta stimulation: There is evidence that stimulation within the beta range can improve attention, measures of intelligence, relieve short-term stress, decrease headaches, and decrease behavioral problems. Some evidence even suggests that beta could decrease emotion-based exhaustion. Many people with slower frequency brain waves may benefit from regular beta stimulation.

Jump up ^ Trost W. and Vuilleumier P., Rhythmic entrainment as a mechanism for emotion induction by music: a neurophysiological perspective. In The Emotional Power of Music: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Musical Arousal, Expression, and Social Control, Cochrane T., Fantini B., and Scherer K. R., (Eds.), Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press; 2013, pp213–225.
Sound and light are the most popular methods to entrain the mind, yet there are a few other options in our toolbox. Using vibrational energy from sources such as magnets and electricity has been proven to help overcome addictions, depression, and even treat neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s. In this section, we cover these alternative forms of brainwave entrainment.
* There are a lot of new features in this release so please take a moment to review the updated help for information on how to use them. As always, if you have any issues or suggestions please drop us an email at support@banzailabs.com so we can respond with any follow up questions we may have. We always try to incorporate user requests, and this update is packed with them, so please keep them coming and we hope you enjoy the update!
Deeper Meditation • Near The Stage Of Sleep • Vivid, Dreamlike Imagery • Creative Visualization • Feel More Open & Connected • Advanced Problem Solving • Super Creativity • Insight • Intuition • Inspiration • Deeper Subconscious To Super-Conscious Mind • Trance-like • GABA • Immune System • Serotonin • Endorphins • Acetylcholine • Lower Cortisol • Deeply Relaxed • Sleep Better • Emotional Intelligence
While it is no doubt that the technology does create changes in a person’s brain waves, whether there are valid scientific benefits resulting from those changes is up for debate. Self-reports from those that have engaged in various types of brainwave entrainment have made claims such as: the software helped treat my depression or improved my mental focus. These claims are often vague and could be subjective and/or a placebo effect.
Yes, brainwave entrainment is based upon science. It has been scientifically proven to work, and to benefit the brain in all kinds of amazing ways. Yes people use things like EEG machines to read how it works on the brain. BUT, this does not mean it is overly complicated, and it does not mean that you have to be overly techy or scientific, or have any experience in neurology at all to create a brainwave entrainment audio or understand how it works.

What I really like about iAwake is their standalone offerings. They produce quite a few audio pieces that are geared toward specific brainwave targets and desired results. These individual products aren't progression - based (you can listen to whatever tracks you want whenever you want), so there's no lengthy investment of your time involved. Also they're way cheaper (around $30-$50 depending on the product). In addition to manipulating brainwaves with sound, they pride themselves on their patented Biofield tech (look them up for more info).

Specific tones that resonate at certain frequencies are created and embedded within the acoustic architecture of the original waveform. Your brainwaves latch onto these embedded carrier frequencies and attune themselves to the same vibratory rate. Brainwave entrainment now occurs that is similar to binaural beats yet there is no need for headphones to deliver these entrainment effects.
Recently developed entrainment software has been designed to correct specific imbalances in hemispheric activity associated with undesirable mind-states. For example, people suffering with depression often have more activity in the right hemisphere, and specially designed brainwave music decreases this activity while increasing activity in the left hemisphere, reducing depression.

The Frequency following response (FFR), also referred to as Frequency Following Potential (FFP), is a specific response to hearing sound and music, by which neural oscillations adjust their frequency to match the rhythm of auditory stimuli. The use of sound with intent to influence cortical brainwave frequency is called auditory driving,[39][40] by which frequency of neural oscillation is 'driven' to entrain with that of the rhythm of a sound source.[41][42]
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