Isochronic tones work by influencing your brainwave activity and they can’t directly affect the body. That said, the brain does control the body, so sensations and feelings can sometimes be felt in the body after stimulating your brainwave activity. Some people who are new listeners of this type of audio can sometimes feel tingling sensations in their body. Not everyone feels this and these sensations usually stop once you get more used to using the audios. Isochronic tones are considered as a safe technology. However, sometimes they can leave you feeling temporarily fatigued, especially if you listen to them for an extended period (hours) when you first start using them. If you felt fatigued, I would recommend using them for a much shorter period while you are getting used to them and ensure you are well-hydrated.
According to both observation and research, after a series of brainwave entrainment practices, the brain learns how to state change. This enables you to achieve certain brainwave effects in the absence of entertainment. Additionally, research shows that children are usually in the Theta stage and this in itself could provide a detailed explanation for their ability to learn fast and remember what they have learned. We can take advantage of this effect and use Alpha and Theta waves to reduce learning time in adults.
The main gist of brainwave entrainment audios, without getting too technical here, is that they effortlessly guide one’s brain (when listened to with stereo headphones) into a specifically targeted state, as designated by the creator of the audio. They are able to alter your brainwave states through the use of specific audio frequencies, and specific beats-the most common of which being binaural beats (though there are other types of beats being used as well).  When one frequency is played into one ear- let’s say 1115 Hz- and a slightly different frequency is played into the other-say 1125 Hz- the brain is forced to reconcile the two, and creates its own “phantom” frequency that is the difference between the two- in this case 10 Hz.  Not only does this allow the brain to be led into specific brainwave states, but it also allows the two hemispheres of the brain to synchronize with each other, stimulating and promoting whole-brain functioning.
There are also ways of directing the entrainment pattern to further stimulate the brain in a desired way. Not all audios stay at the same frequency the whole time. Some will increase and decrease for a desired effect. Some will blend different beats at certain time to exercise the brain in a specific way. It is things like this that separate a good audio from a mediocre audio, and the difference between the two is undeniable when compared.
If you’ve used brainwave entrainment and experienced any benefits, feel free to share your experience in the comments section below. Be sure to discuss why you believe the entrainment was effective and/or whether you think it could’ve been a placebo effect. I’ve played around with the products and feel as if they are great for relaxation enhancement, inducing a temporary perceptual change (i.e. altered state of consciousness), and arousal reduction.
As somewhat of a modern mystic, I have studied altered states of consciousness, but due to my monkey mind, I have only been able to experience them to a very minor degree. I have tried so many methods of meditation to little avail. But I became aware that I would not be able to progress in my spiritual life if I could not achieve at least a modicum of success in meditation.
As a trader, having focus is not a luxury, it’s a necessity for making the best decisions under pressure. The music and meditations allow me to bring my best game each and every day. I am more tuned into work for longer and better and with a steady energy and calmness. I am also a writer with a fairly high demand on output meaning I need to get a quality 700 to 1800 words of analysis created daily. And again I rely on TrypnauralMediations.com to put my mind at it' most clear and creative. It delivers every time.
Brainwaves, or neural oscillations, share the fundamental constituents with acoustic and optical waves, including frequency, amplitude and periodicity. Consequently, Huygens' discovery precipitated inquiry[citation needed] into whether or not the synchronous electrical activity of cortical neural ensembles might not only alter in response to external acoustic or optical stimuli but also entrain or synchronize their frequency to that of a specific stimulus.[16][17][18][19]
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