I like it. I like the fact that I can just sit there and observe my thoughts and feelings and then go back to watching my breathing. It really does teach me to be centered and balanced. I look forward to the next several weeks. By the way, what I am doing now is meditating for 23 minutes in the early morning and again 23 minutes in the early evening. I’ll check back with you.
Depression: Currently there is no substantial evidence to support the idea that brainwave entrainment treats depression in adults. Some evidence goes as far as to suggest that the wrong entrainment protocol (e.g. slow wave stimulation) may actually increase certain measures of depression. Stimulation of delta and/or theta, will likely worsen the condition and alpha is unlikely to have an effect.
I first became aware of brainwave meditation programs  and brain waves when researching alternative methods for treating the bipolar disorder I had been unsuccessfully living with my entire adult life. I eventually learned a method of releasing difficult emotions on the spot, which I then practiced extensively, and consequently found it easier and even desirable to meditate for fairly lengthy periods of time. Though I took up meditation as a serious daily practice and experienced many undeniable benefits, I nonetheless intermittently experienced life-debilitating bouts of mania and severe depression, often resulting in chaotic mixed states and an inability to maintain daily social functions. During these times, it became nearly impossible to sit in meditation.
In 1984 medical researcher Dr. Gene W. Brockopp published a paper making several conclusions of audio and visual entrainment (AVE). Such conclusions were that hemispheric synchronization caused by AVE is related to increased intellectual functioning, practiced use of AVE overtime leads to a cumulative effect, and AVE may result in the recovery of early childhood experiences.
It has been both a pleasure and an enlightening experience listening to the Equisync II CDs for the past month. As a 15 year stroke survivor, daily meditation has become a part of my life. Listening to these CDs reminds me of sitting alone in a forest during periods of rain, whether they be light, heavy, or in between. I am able to access my right hemisphere more readily and experience the feeling of nirvana that we all have within us. When I reach this point, my system reminds itself of all the compassion and connectedness we each have.

I have read something different about theta waves and learning languages. A University of Washington study tested students resting brainwave activity before learning French. They found that students with a higher amount beta/gamma and a lower amount of delta/theta activity were better at acquiring a second language. When you are dominant in theta, that is the lowest and most deeply relaxed awakened state you can be in. I think it would be much harder to really concentrate, fully understand and learn new information while in a theta state, so I would personally consider using theta while studying.

Besides, Holosync® users look forward to their listening session because the experience is wonderful, and you feel so good afterwards. But still, you do have to be willing to actually use the program. If you aren’t willing—if you don’t think the incredible mental, emotional, and spiritual benefits of this program are worth the time commitment—this isn’t for you.
Isochronic tones work just the same in delta as they do in alpha, theta and beta and they are widely used in the brainwave entrainment community to help people sleep. Like you, I’ve also seen some websites saying they don’t work in delta, but it’s a bit like the game of Chinese Whispers, where someone makes a comment and then after it gets passed around and shared a lot the message gets distorted and appears to be a fact. I don’t know of any scientific reason why they wouldn’t work in delta. I remember some people talking about this on a brainwave entrainment forum many years ago. They were saying they found isochronic tones a bit too abrupt for using to help them sleep and they preferred binaural beats, as they thought they were a more soothing sound. That was just a personal preference shared by a couple of prominent forum members at the time and some people then took that as a fact for everyone. That’s where I think that belief originated from.

Use traditional meditation to create the changes in the brain that lead to the benefits I’ve described here. Of course that means going through a long learning curve while you master the art of meditation, motivating yourself to sit each day to meditate. And, to get the benefits I’ve described, you’ll need to meditate several hours each day), and continue in that way for 30+ years.


One can also learn to control and slow down their brain waves through various neurofeedback technologies such as electroencephalograph (EEG), galvanic skin response (GSR), and heart, pulse and breath rate monitors. These devices measure stress and relaxation parameters and then "play" back the signals to the user so they can use the signals as a beacon to guide and "steer" themselves into a relaxed state. This takes some time, work and discipline but is much quicker than learning meditation.

In the 1980s, a researcher in Japan, Tsuyoshi Inouye described how light stimulation creates synchronization of brain hemispheres. Since then, other researchers have detailed the positive effects of hemispheric synchronization including a 1984 study by researcher Dr. Gene W. Brockopp stating that hemispheric synchronization resulted in improved intellectual functioning as well as improvements in long-term memory, and these effects are cumulative over time.

Theta stimulation: There appears to be no benefit associated with using theta stimulation for cognitive functioning, mood, or stress relief. While theta may be a useful way to induce sleep or alter your state of consciousness, there really isn’t much science supporting entrainment in this particular range for most purposes. Photic stimulation of theta between 5 Hz and 7 Hz can be useful for headaches.


The Transparent Corp forum – This forum is an invaluable resource for any brainwave entrainment user or enthusiast.  Most of the feedback is obviously focused on the Transparent Corp software, but with over 20,000+ posts now you can find answers to the whole array of brainwave entrainment questions on there.  (UPDATE: Sadly, the Transparent Corp forum has now been taken offline)
This thing blows my mind! The first time I used it I was like "No way!" As I kept using it I discovered that it is literally the only way I am able to fall asleep nights when my mind is so full of thoughts and my anxiety is running rampant! I hate the way sleep aids make me feel like I've been run over by a freight train. I recently switched from using "Deep Sleep" to "Dreamy Sleep" and had the craziest dreams! I normally can't remember my dreams and I was actually able to recall quite a bit of them. Unfortunately last night, I dreamt that I faked the death of my dog last year and I felt like it lasted the whole night so I think I'll be switching back to "Deep Sleep" :( Awesome product though. My *only* complaint is that I wish there were more ambiance options or the ability to use it with Pandora. You can use your own music but I don't have much personal music on my phone so I am limited to using the app's ambiance tracks and they get old after a while. Highly recommend!

The main gist of brainwave entrainment audios, without getting too technical here, is that they effortlessly guide one’s brain (when listened to with stereo headphones) into a specifically targeted state, as designated by the creator of the audio. They are able to alter your brainwave states through the use of specific audio frequencies, and specific beats-the most common of which being binaural beats (though there are other types of beats being used as well).  When one frequency is played into one ear- let’s say 1115 Hz- and a slightly different frequency is played into the other-say 1125 Hz- the brain is forced to reconcile the two, and creates its own “phantom” frequency that is the difference between the two- in this case 10 Hz.  Not only does this allow the brain to be led into specific brainwave states, but it also allows the two hemispheres of the brain to synchronize with each other, stimulating and promoting whole-brain functioning.
So often it is presented as such a highly scientific technology that can only be created by “experts”. Buzz words like “scientific”, “certified engineer”, “frequencies”, “cortical evoked response”, “anterior brain activity”, are used to make it seem over-complicated, and pseudo-scientific pictures of “data” and “brain readings” are pasted all over sites to further qualify claims of how powerful and amazing these people’s product is.
Your brain operates at certain levels of activity – the normal waking, active Beta, the meditative Alpha, the asleep-and-dreaming or deep meditative Theta, and the deep sleep/unconscious Delta. Beta is characterized by one thing we all want to get away from – stress.But that brainwave state has its place. It’s the action mode, and that’s the way it should be! If we’re not alert when we’re awake, bad things can happen, right?
Gamma brainwaves occur during creative thinking and processing of memory and language and in many learning activities. These brainwaves are not present at all when a person is under anesthesia, but return as soon as the person becomes conscious again. Multiple scientific studies have shown gamma brainwave entrainment to be helpful for reducing distractibility, improving short-term memory, improving motor coordination, and relieving migraine headaches.
Subsequently, the term 'entrainment' has been used to describe a shared tendency of many physical and biological systems to synchronize their periodicity and rhythm through interaction. This tendency has been identified as specifically pertinent to the study of sound and music generally, and acoustic rhythms specifically. The most ubiquitous and familiar examples of neuromotor entrainment to acoustic stimuli is observable in spontaneous foot or finger tapping to the rhythmic beat of a song.
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