Some people are more sensitive to the audios than others – if you are one of them, be sure to take a break from what you are listening to and come back to it later. Always follow your body’s signals, and don’t hesitate to ask questions. You can always drop me a line for some honest advice on anything related to brainwave entrainment, meditation, holistic health, etc. You can also rest assured that all brainwave entrainment products listed here are of the highest quality – most of them I have used for years. I also highly recommend reading What Is The Best Brainwave Entrainment Product, too.  Don’t feel shy to bother the creators of the products themselves, and their support teams – you are in your full right to do so!
A study published in Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology by Paul Williams and Michael West in 1975 examined the brainwave states of people experienced in meditation while using photic stimulation, and another study by Leonard, Telch, and Harrington in 1999 examined the successful use of brainwave entrainment techniques for attaining meditative states in subjects.
The objectives and inclusion criteria of the review were clear. Relevant sources were searched for studies, although the restriction to published studies in English meant that the review was prone to publication and language biases. The authors did not state whether steps were taken to minimise the risk of bias and error in the processes of study selection and data extraction (for example, by having more than one reviewer independently make decisions). The authors mentioned which studies were blinded, but it did not appear that study validity was systematically assessed, which made it difficult to judge the reliability of the review findings. The decision to combine studies by narrative synthesis appeared appropriate given the strong clinical heterogeneity between the studies, but the authors failed to quantify the size or statistical significance of the findings reported. The evidence presented appeared to justify the authors’ conclusions that further research was justified, but in view of the dearth of good-quality evidence and problems with methodology and reporting in the review, the conclusions regarding efficacy did not appear reliable.
“…humans have always been intrigued by the possibilities for influencing mental functioning that emerge from combining rhythmic sound and rhythmic light stimulation. Ancient rituals for entering trance states often involved both rhythmic sounds in the form of drum beats, clapping, or chanting and flickering lights produced by candles, torches, bonfires, or long lines of human bodies passing before the fire and chopping the light into mesmerizing rhythmic flashes. From Greek plays to Western opera, our most popular entertainment forms have made use of combinations of lights and sounds. Some composers, such as the visionary Scriabin, actually created music intended to be experienced in combination with rhythmic light displays.”
Lucid dreaming: A lucid dream is considered a dream that a person is aware of and often able to consciously manipulate.  Many have alleged that using brainwave entrainment technology makes it easier to experience a lucid dream.  Scientists have studied this phenomenon and noticed that beta frequencies within the range of 13 to 19 Hz tend to be generated to keep the person conscious.  Additionally there is significant increased activity in the parietal lobes of the brain, which allows an individual to stay conscious.
You’ve probably heard people talk about the power of “positive thinking.” While some might tell you that it’s based on faith or strong belief, research has shown that there’s a third ingredient that helps you get that frame of mind – Alpha brainwaves. The rhythm produced by this brainwave – especially those that hit the frequency of 10 Hz – is said to help in the enhancement of one’s mood and thoughts, enabling one to experience and enjoy a positive state of mind.
Neural oscillations are rhythmic or repetitive electrochemical activity in the brain and central nervous system. Such oscillations can be characterized by their frequency, amplitude and phase. Neural tissue can generate oscillatory activity driven by mechanisms within individual neurons, as well as by interactions between them. They may also adjust frequency to synchronize with the periodic vibration of external acoustic or visual stimuli.[3]
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