Hi Et, In all the feedback and studies I’ve read and looked into over the years, I’ve seen lots of feedback from people talking about how they don’t like the sound of the tones, or they find them irritating in some way. Unfortunately, there doesn’t seem to be any particular reason why one person likes it and the next doesn’t. It’s a bit like normal music, one person’s sweet symphony is another person pneumatic drill. It’s common for people to find it weird and maybe annoying at first, which is how I felt in the beginning. But usually after a few listens you can start to get used to it and appreciate the sound, and especially the feeling it gives you. Personally, I think it can help if you try to embrace the sound, psychologically speaking beforehand. It can also help to have the sound playing at a very low volume, to begin with, then building it up as you get more used to it.
Participating in this program requires that you use your Holosync® soundtracks (!)—which takes some time. Though you’re free to do less (and progress more slowly), we suggest that you start with a half hour of listening each day, progressing to an hour a day. My bet is you’ll eagerly look forward to these sessions, though, rather than seeing them as a chore.
In BrainAscend, each brainwave frequency is stimulated for several minutes before progressing deeper.  Much like a staircase type of progression, but with small and smooth steps. This is the most effetive way and also stimulates the release of "feel good" brain chemicals such as serotonin which makes you feel happy. This chart shows the range that each level covers as well as the whole program.
Neural oscillations are rhythmic or repetitive electrochemical activity in the brain and central nervous system. Such oscillations can be characterized by their frequency, amplitude and phase. Neural tissue can generate oscillatory activity driven by mechanisms within individual neurons, as well as by interactions between them. They may also adjust frequency to synchronize with the periodic vibration of external acoustic or visual stimuli.[3]
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