Thanks, this was the kind of article I was looking for. I most have gotten over excited as I read a post about a guy who had major success with 40hz binaural beats. I wanted to make my own experiment, but I see now that I will need to continue my research and gather more background information. Maybe one should have his physiology examined? In order to have a professional opinion on whether or not it will be altered or damaged by use of brainwave entrainment (Maybe you happen to be a very vulnerable individual). Getting trustworthy guidance from an experienced source would also be nice 🙂

Quick example: Brainwave readings (with an EEG machine) have shown that brainwaves of 2Hz occur when an individual is asleep. Scientists can create special audio recordings, which contain an encoded 2Hz frequency. While listening to such audio, the brain naturally follows (entrains) toward that 2Hz frequency, lowering its brainwave patterns. That's "brainwave entrainment." The net result is that when listening to such an audio recording, you (the listener) will naturally fall asleep.
The authors concluded that preliminary evidence suggested that brainwave entrapment was an effective therapeutic tool, but further research was required. The evidence presented appeared to justify the recommendation for further research. In view of the lack of controlled evidence and problems with methodology and reporting in the review, the authors’ conclusions regarding efficacy did not appear reliable.
Well, I finally listened to “Equisync III” after listening to “Equisync I” & the “Equisync II” several times. Let me just say that this put me in another state of consciousness within 7 minutes(guessing) it was beautiful! I meditated throughout the entire 70 minute CD set! It didn’t feel like 70 minutes. I could feel energy in my neck, my solar plexus area and at the brow of my head! Definitely NOT for beginners!
A popular opinion in the brainwave entrainment community is that listening to isochronic tones without music produces a much stronger effect.  However, in the study by Doherty, Cormac. “A comparison of alpha brainwave entrainment, with and without musical accompaniment” (2014),  it was concluded that brainwave entrainment was equally effective for isochronic tones, both with and without music.
Lucid dreaming: A lucid dream is considered a dream that a person is aware of and often able to consciously manipulate.  Many have alleged that using brainwave entrainment technology makes it easier to experience a lucid dream.  Scientists have studied this phenomenon and noticed that beta frequencies within the range of 13 to 19 Hz tend to be generated to keep the person conscious.  Additionally there is significant increased activity in the parietal lobes of the brain, which allows an individual to stay conscious.
Hi Ulka, thanks for your compliment on my article. Unfortunately, I haven’t come across any studies or much discussion about the problem with habituation and isochronic tones and how to overcome it. The consensus among experienced users is to regularly change the frequencies and music soundtracks you listen to. Adding music to the tones does change the waveform you are stimulated with, so that’s one of the main reasons why I provide different soundtracks for my isochronic tones sessions. I have released some tracks which use amplitude modulations in the music, instead of isochronic tones. It might be worth giving them a try if you haven’t already. I have them in a playlist on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lj5tHl2cuWw&list=PLveg0IEcZWN6OIRZyLkv0BJADY7Q6xFCl.
They use a proprietary process of ‘3 point dynamic audio entrainment’ which means that they use both binaural beats and isochronic tones, layered together with another process called temporal entrainment (the stretching and compressing of sound waves in order to speed up or slow down the brain). This 3 pronged effect on your brainwaves is very powerful, so powerful they are currently in the process of trying to patent it.
Brainwave entrainment is a colloquialism for such 'neural entrainment', which is a term used to denote the way in which the aggregate frequency of oscillations produced by the synchronous electrical activity in ensembles of cortical neurons can adjust to synchronize with the periodic vibration of an external stimuli, such as a sustained acoustic frequency perceived as pitch, a regularly repeating pattern of intermittent sounds, perceived as rhythm, or of a regularly rhythmically intermittent flashing light.
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