If you’ve used brainwave entrainment and experienced any benefits, feel free to share your experience in the comments section below. Be sure to discuss why you believe the entrainment was effective and/or whether you think it could’ve been a placebo effect. I’ve played around with the products and feel as if they are great for relaxation enhancement, inducing a temporary perceptual change (i.e. altered state of consciousness), and arousal reduction.
Good to hear from you and glad you got some value from the article. In total honesty I do feel that brainwave entrainment is safe, and that the big point is not to over-use it, or to push yourself too hard. You can almost think of it like an herb or nutritional supplement. You don’t expect big results the day/week of taking it, and if you don’t get results, you don’t keep taking more. You take it in regular safe doses over a recommended period of time and let it synergistically work its magic. Generally I think you are safe to listen to the audio you made, I just recommend taking it gradually with gamma in particular. Listen for just 10-15 minutes at first and see how your brain handles it. If it doesn’t produce any unwanted feelings then jump right in. But even then I recommend only listening once per day, and taking one day off per week.
I’ve been using equisync first thing in the morning after I get up, and listen to all three tracks in a row. I again listen to all three tracks in the late afternoon. If I don’t have that much time available, I will start on Track 2 or 3, as necessary. I have really started to focus on my breathing, and notice the difference – I finish the session in a DEEPLY relaxed state.
These sounds in these musical tracks are presented through monaural beats, binaural beats, isochronic tones, or a mixture involving combinations of all three of these modalities, described in detail below. Choose alpha brainwave tracks for calming anxiety and relaxing body and mind, and choose theta tracks for help in getting to sleep and for bringing hidden feelings to the surface. Some people also report out-of-body type experiences when in theta brainwave states.
Most programs start at a work/life busy brain Beta frequency of twenty light flashes per second (20Hz) and slowly ramp them down to Alpha (relaxation and meditation) at 8-12 HZ, Theta (deep relaxation and dreaming) at 4-8 Hz) and Delta (dreamless deep relaxation) of .5-4Hz. We have taken measurements at Mass General with state of the art EEG equipment and have seen a slowing of the brain waves from Beta to Theta in two minutes and complete brain wave harmonization in the left, right, anterior, posterior and occipital regions of the brain.
One of the most fascinating and beneficial things about Delta brainwaves is their ability to stimulate the release of anti-aging hormones in the body, such as HGH (human growth hormone). Increased melatonin levels are also common in this state, and regular visits to Delta have also been shown to decrease cortisol levels. (Cortisol is a hormone that is released during stressful situations, that has been linked with the aging process.) In a nutshell, Delta brainwaves are very healthy, and until now have only been accessible to us during deep sleep.
All brainwave frequencies are useful and beneficial at certain times – there is no brainwave that is intrinsically better than another. However, by deliberately choosing to attain a particular brainwave state, a corresponding mental state can be brought about at the same time. For example, a working person who has been in an overly alert beta brainwave pattern for many hours can quickly shift their mind and body into a relaxed state by listening to a few minutes of brainwave entrainment music for inducing alpha or theta brainwaves.
The functional role of neural oscillations is still not fully understood;[6] however they have been shown to correlate with emotional responses, motor control, and a number of cognitive functions including information transfer, perception, and memory.[7][8][9] Specifically, neural oscillations, in particular theta activity, are extensively linked to memory function, and coupling between theta and gamma activity is considered to be vital for memory functions, including episodic memory.[10][11][12]
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