"I have been using Quantum Mind Power for two weeks and today I feel that although the changes are subtle, I have been able to overcome many roadblocks in my personal life. I have ADHD and have been taking Adderall for 7 years, recently I decided that I need to stop and have cut my dosage in half with the intention of completely stopping within a month.  I have also just started teaching Pilates as a second job.....

I definitely NEED (& can feel a difference mentally) Gamma the most. Beta and Alpha do better my processing. Theta waves are TERRIBLE! My normal symptoms increase when listening to those frequencies! Delta has been helpful for me around nighttime. It has helped my sleep on occasion. *Note: Do not listen to higher frequencies (Gamma, Beta) before bedtime! They will keep you very alert.
Hello Jason, this is an unusually thoughtful discussion. Thank you for all your expertise and your kind manner of presenting and moderating it. I’m wondering if you have any experience with this: ever since I’ve been exposed to theta wave music, without headphones, I have found it irritating. And this is in spite of the fact that when I was first handed a CD by someone I knew well and trusted he was so confident I’d love it It didn’t occur to either of us that I might not. This happened again recently, which is about 10 years later, when I heard it playing overhead at an acupuncture clinic. I felt restless and even irritated, unable to zone out, which is unusual for me, during the treatment. I realized that the quality of my irritation was similar to what I’d felt listening to that CD a decade ago.So I asked if it was theta wave music and she said yes. The acupuncturist said that some people, but a vast minority, really dislike the music. She said that the few people who dislike it are not simply neutral, but actively dislike it. And she also said, but most people like it a lot. I’m just wondering what kind of factors might be present that would make a person feel so irritated by this music?
I later learned that a Nobel Prize-winning scientist, Ilya Prigogine, had developed a theoretical model regarding the evolution of complex systems (like the human mind) that described these quantum leaps in awareness and brain-power I was experiencing—to a “T”—and explained why they happened! I read everything I could get my hands on about his work.
A common element in recordings incorporating alpha and theta frequencies is a steady but barely perceptible rhythm of the frequencies themselves. This subtle and calming pulse mixes with sounds of gentle breezes, distant bird songs, and the slow progression of deep synth notes. Underneath this, below the audible sounds at sub 16 hertz levels, other frequencies intermingle, deepening the merging of conscious and unconscious mind.
Some research suggests that the benefits from brainwave entrainment can last a lot longer, and still be seen for some time after you've stopped using it.  Study participants have still maintained improved test scores a few weeks after the stimulation had ceased.  Research on the long-term benefits has so far been minimal though, so how long the effects last is still up for debate.
With regard to listening without headphones specifically, you might find it irritating if you are someone who suffers from motion sickness, depending on how the track is created. If you were listening to binaural beats, they really need headphones to work properly. If you are in a room and closer to one speaker you may not even hear binaural beats properly, and if sitting off centre in the room generally, that may have unsettled you if you have motion sickness as the tones try to form a beat in your head. If it was just a standard isochronic tones theta track that shouldn’t be irritating if you have motion sickness.

With brainwave entrainment audio, the brain will "catch on" and follow (entrain to) the desired brainwave frequency. BrainAscend uses the binaural and isochronic type of entrainment together with amplitude modulation. Isochronic tones have been proven to be the most effective brainwave entrainment technology and does not require headphones.  Binaural beats are powerful when it comes to increasing synchronization of the brain hemispheres. You don't have to use headphones, though it is suggested. This is automatic meditation. Press play, close your eyes and BrainAscend does the rest!
2) You are being dissociated – When using AVE, you get drawn into the present moment and let go of thoughts relating to your daily hassles, hectic schedules, paying bills, worries, threats or anxieties and stop the unhealthy mental “chatter.” Dissociation involves a “disconnection” of self from thoughts and body awareness, as is experienced during deep meditation. Dissociation begins in four to eight minutes from properly applied AVE.
With digital upgrades, Berger’s machine is still in use today, known as an electroencephalography machine, or EEG. Berger used his machine to study the brains of psychologically normal and abnormal people and discovered the first brainwave, called the alpha wave and also known as the Berger wave, along with the faster beta wave, which he observed suppressing the alpha wave when subjects opened their closed eyes. 
It was a few months after the birth of our second child that I came to truly understand the effects of long-term sleep deprivation. Constantly waking up at 1:00 or 3:00 a.m. soon turned daily life into a hazy blur. I'd often find myself lying in bed, anticipating the next round of crying, or later in the night, I'd be tossing and turning for ages after being woken up. It's no fun whatsoever to drag yourself out of bed every morning with dark circles under your eyes. During this time, it became … [Read more...]
I later learned that a Nobel Prize-winning scientist, Ilya Prigogine, had developed a theoretical model regarding the evolution of complex systems (like the human mind) that described these quantum leaps in awareness and brain-power I was experiencing—to a “T”—and explained why they happened! I read everything I could get my hands on about his work.

Jump up ^ Bittman, B. B., Snyder, C., Bruhn, K. T., Liebfreid, F., Stevens, C. K., Westengard, J., and Umbach, P. O., Recreational music-making: An integrative group intervention for reducing burnout and improving mood states in first year associate degree nursing students: Insights and economic impact" International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship, Vol. 1, Article 12, 2004.
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