You’ll learn about the science behind Holosync®, how it works, what happened as over 2.2 million others used it, and much more. This book means so much to Holosync® users that many bring it to public events so I can autograph it for them. Embarrassing for me, but also a compliment—and evidence of how much Thresholds of the Mind means to those who’ve read it.

Our brains follow cues from outside stimuli, and brainwaves mimic the pulse rates of the sounds we expose it to. So, by creating tracks that pulse sound waves at a desired frequency, we can effectively coax our brain into that state. In layman's terms; by listening to some strange sounding brainwave frequency audios, we can literally slip our brain into a state of feeling calm, alert, focused, energized... and the list goes on. Pretty cool, right!?
* Headphones/Earbuds are Required for Binaural Tones to be Effective as the Left Ear and Right Ear Audio must be isolated for the Brain to perceive the inaudible low-frequency difference between the two sides. ** Changes to Orientation Support: With the upcoming arrival of several new devices with new screen-sizes and aspect ratios, iOS 8 required a re-write of our iPhone and iPad UI to support these devices, and as part of that, we have returned the app to a Portrait-only view for now. Once we know what these future screen dimensions and Aspect Ratios are, and have time to work with the real devices, we can implement a new Landscape UI for the iPad.
Binaural beats require two separate tones from two sources that are combined inside the listener’s brain to form the target tone. The lower frequency sound is called the carrier tone, and it is combined with a higher frequency sound known as the offset tone. Because of this, binaural beats must be listened to with stereo headphones or the effect is lost. Binaural beats create a hypnotic effect, but they are not the most effective tool for brainwave entrainment, and binaural beats are often ineffective for people with hearing loss.
***NOTE: (Last one) Please do research on which brainwaves do what before just trying out the first track you find! Also read descriptions of what frequencies are being used in the track, so you know what you are training your brain to! (Example: You struggle with OCD and have some anxiety. You see a track titled “Clear, Focused Thinking” and you try it out w/o reading the description. You either do not experience anything or you end up with worse anxiety/headache than before. If you knew before starting, that your problems were caused by too much Beta wave activity in your brain and the track was all low Beta ramping up to high Beta – you would not listen to it!)
Thanks for the coupons, I had originally looked into these cd’s after my doctor recommended them, but my mom wound up buying them for me for Christmas (she didn’t know about the coupons I had!) Anyway just listened to Equisync II today for the first time, I was in such a state as to where I didn’t know if I’d fallen asleep or not! I hadn’t but was in such an amazing place.

So you see, it’s all about where your personal journey is taking you, and what direction of evolution you are wanting to explore.  The purpose of this site is to assist you in making an educated decision about what product is right for you, and to ensure that you are only recommended a high-quality product that will provide you with powerful and noticeable results.  The great news is that many of the benefits of using Brainwave Entrainment (improved sleep patterns, release of anti-aging hormones, whole-brain functioning, etc.) are simply side-effects of using any type of brainwave entrainment audio.
Beta stimulation: There is evidence that stimulation within the beta range can improve attention, measures of intelligence, relieve short-term stress, decrease headaches, and decrease behavioral problems. Some evidence even suggests that beta could decrease emotion-based exhaustion. Many people with slower frequency brain waves may benefit from regular beta stimulation.

…I got curious about the Equisync II CDs and it was the 2nd track that started giving me some body signs that revealed me I was in the alpha state. I never practiced meditation before, however, I follow the Gurdjieff and Ouspensky teachings which, if you are not aware, tell us how to do quite the same thing as meditation in our everyday lives while performing our daily tasks. I also believe that Equisync II was more appropriate for me because my life is also dedicated to collective causes, my personal life is totally under control, but your CDs were able to relieve my severe depression after only 3 days of practicing, my chronic insomnia condition which had been lasting for over 27 years seemed to be finally healed. I am truly amazed, really.
Additionally, most of the studies have been conducted with extremely small samples and the touted benefits are vague. When studying the effects, it would be beneficial to hook each participant up to an EEG, note initial brainwave activity, then post-entrainment, note any changes. Although certain conditions share similarities in brainwave activity, this is clearly not always the case.
“The great neuroscientist W. Gray Walter carried out a series of experiments in the late forties and fifties in which he used an electronic stroboscopic device in combination with EEG equipment to send rhythmic light flashes into the eyes of the subjects at frequencies ranging from ten to twenty five flashes per second. He was startled to find that the flickering seemed to alter the brain-wave activity of the whole cortex instead of just the areas associated with vision. Wrote Walter, “The rhythmic series of flashes appear to be breaking down some of the physiologic barriers between different regions of the brain. This means the stimulus of flicker received by the visual projection area of the cortex was breaking bounds— its ripples were overflowing into other areas.”

Jump up ^ Trost W. and Vuilleumier P., Rhythmic entrainment as a mechanism for emotion induction by music: a neurophysiological perspective. In The Emotional Power of Music: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Musical Arousal, Expression, and Social Control, Cochrane T., Fantini B., and Scherer K. R., (Eds.), Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press; 2013, pp213–225.
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