Hi Et, In all the feedback and studies I’ve read and looked into over the years, I’ve seen lots of feedback from people talking about how they don’t like the sound of the tones, or they find them irritating in some way. Unfortunately, there doesn’t seem to be any particular reason why one person likes it and the next doesn’t. It’s a bit like normal music, one person’s sweet symphony is another person pneumatic drill. It’s common for people to find it weird and maybe annoying at first, which is how I felt in the beginning. But usually after a few listens you can start to get used to it and appreciate the sound, and especially the feeling it gives you. Personally, I think it can help if you try to embrace the sound, psychologically speaking beforehand. It can also help to have the sound playing at a very low volume, to begin with, then building it up as you get more used to it.
In 1839 Heinrich Wilhelm Dove discovered binaural beats, which led to the further discovery of the frequency following response and the beginnings of the science of brainwave entrainment. This science uses the power of specialized sound to FORCE your brain to stop producing defective brainwave patterns - OVERRIDING them to create positive neural feedback instead. Endorphins are created to alleviate pain, serotonin increases to combat anxiety - happy brain chemicals of all kinds are made in response. And the best news? As you continue with it, your brain re-learns to produce these healthy, beneficial and healing brainwaves on its own!
So if you are interested in using brainwave entrainment music in your own recording, do so with the knowledge that it can only help to improve the quality of your work. But please don’t feel as though your recordings will be insufficient without it (some people do worry about this - unnecessarily). My advice is that if you ever find yourself in a situation where the music you love the most is not available with brainwave entrainment frequencies, don’t ignore your intuition and discard that music in favour of music that is. When you find that piece of music that brings your recording to life, go with it whether it has brainwave entrainment frequencies or not. The quality and feel of the music itself are the most important factors.

If you find that you are really heavily into overwhelm, you can just turn the volume down and meditate with the biofield amplitudefrom your iPod, CD player, PC, or Mac transmitting a very healing biofield technology that allows you to dig deeper into meditative states without putting your nervous system on edge. Now you are pushing and purifying your nervous system without bludgeoning it.


Thanks for your compliment on my article. 🙂 There are some frequency lists which reference and quote some links to metabolism, but I don’t know how effective or reliable that information is. One of the good things but also a drawback of this technology is how accessible it is to use and create tracks. That makes it unattractive for big companies to invest in large-scale research because it’s hard to patent and protect any product they produce based on the research. As soon as they released the frequency data, people like me would produce free videos and cheap MP3s to utilise the research, so they wouldn’t be able to get a good return on their research investment. So to try and gain some insight into what is working for people, at the moment, we are relying upon assessing anecdotal feedback in many areas. Before buying any products/tracks for increasing metabolism, I would look for and try out free videos on YouTube first, to try and gauge how those particular tracks and frequencies work for you.
With each pulsed tone, the brain produces an electrical response. The effects one experiences are the creations of the brains reaction to the “tones”, what neurologists call the “cortical evoked response” (the electrical response of the top most cortical layer of the brain). The brain is a mass of neurons, each taking part in storing, retrieving and transmitting electro-chemical impulses: information, colors, images, sounds, smells and tastes. Brainwave entrainment stimulates different areas of the brain allowing for the awakening and subsequent release of various levels of stored material. It also has an effect of  quietening the mind for clearer thought and process.
In 1984 medical researcher Dr. Gene W. Brockopp published a paper making several conclusions of audio and visual entrainment (AVE). Such conclusions were that hemispheric synchronization caused by AVE is related to increased intellectual functioning, practiced use of AVE overtime leads to a cumulative effect, and AVE may result in the recovery of early childhood experiences.

If brainwave entrainment leaves you with unwanted side-effects (see below) or discomfort, you’re probably encouraging a range of brainwaves that are already excessive in some area of your brain. The way around this is to get a brain map to see what your brain’s strengths and weaknesses are, and see what (if any) brainwaves could use some encouragement. 
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