In March I started using the CDs that I affectionately call “Meditation for Dummies” and am very pleased with the results so far. My blood pressure has dropped, I am sleeping better and notice that I feel much more calm and less stressed. Instead of feeling that I need to “find the time” in my schedule to meditate, I look forward to that totally relaxing half hour–that peaceful feeling of floating.
This is why we have included not just audios in our program The Missing Link, but also include step by step instructions on how to meditate while listening to the audios, how to harness the chi in your energy system while going through this metamorphosis, and how to direct your mind in a way that all of this integrates in a way that propels you forward in the direction you want to go.
Much of what is currently written about brainwave entrainment, especially on the internet, is simply … incorrect.  It seems par for the course that when something of huge value is discovered as a potential ‘internet product’ that it is going to be marketed within an inch of it’s life. And often with less than stellar regard for actual science, research, or factual knowledge. 
While the physiological and psychological processes being uncovered by brain science in the study of brainwaves is sometimes complex and still being investigated, certain basic principles are well-established, easily understood, and helpful for achieving the most effectively use of brainwave entrainment when seeking relaxation, improved sleep, lowering of anxiety, or other goals. This important background information and scientific knowledge presented here includes: 
After one month of using Equisync, I feel relaxed, calm and not stressed at all, despite that I am leaving my present job soon for an early retirement, I handle the situation very well. I have the feeling that I’m going to be ok and there is nothing to worry about. This is what I have gained so far from using Equisync and it’s really meaningful in the erratic world that we live in.
Chronic fatigue: Subjective improvements in energy level may be reported by those who increase stimulatory beta and gamma waves. Fast waves tend to be associated with higher levels of arousal. Low arousal is associated with chronic fatigue and may be exacerbated by slow brain waves (e.g. theta and delta). As of now there aren’t any studies that have analyzed various protocols for their effect on a person’s energy or arousal.
[…] We are fortunate in this day and age to have technology available to us that effortlessly leads the brain into deep meditation, through a scientific process called the ”frequency following response”.  This amazing technology, most commonly called brainwave entrainment, substantially enhances the meditative process, and allows people in their very first session to reach brainwave states that would otherwise take several years to reach through traditional meditation techniques.  This means that you can start reaping the powerful benefits of meditation quickly, and without having to exercise your “discipline muscle” at all!  If you are interested- learn more about brainwave entrainment. […]
Brainwave entrainment music can be used almost anywhere and anytime, making this mood and self-improvement method versatile and flexible enough to do at work, while traveling, or at other times during the day. When used in the workplace during short rest periods, brainwave entrainment techniques can enhance concentration, communication, and work productivity.

The most common way to use a brainwave entrainment is for a short-term benefit, to help guide your brain into a particular mental state at the time you need it.  In a similar way to how you might take a sleeping pill before bed to help you get to sleep, or maybe drink some coffee or an energy drink to help wake you up and give you a boost of energy.
With these studies in mind, EquiSync's revolutionary, multi-layered, multi-tiered approach was born. Designed to synchronize and harmonize your brainwaves while allowing you access to the deepest, most pleasurable, most beneficial states of meditation — much faster than the traditional route, EquiSync® has made mastering meditation easier than ever!
The technology transmits voice messages on close to ultrasonic frequencies that we can not consciously hear, directly into the subconscious mind, with no chance for the conscious mind to filter the information, making it powerful enough for subliminal control. This technology is now available for self improvement purposes with categories such as:  Self confidence, motivation, focus, stress relief, sleep and memory improvement. You can also get your very own custom subliminals to program yourself with anything you want. In 1996, Edward Tilton, President of Silent Sounds claimed that such technology had been used successfully even in military operations to make enemy troops lose morale and surrender. Now we use it for self improvement!
I have never been more creative, productive, more loving to all people nor have I ever been happier in my life. All the wisdom I have found in my pursuit of happiness was somewhere in my intellect. Now it is a part of me. I am using it. I now consider myself a model for younger people to let them see how it is possible to function and be everything they’ve wanted to be. I just celebrated my 85th birthday and I am as young as when I was 25. Thank you for giving me the gift of my true self.

So my question is: Why? When I read it, I had a bit of a fear of brain aneurysms. Therefore, 1. could someone contact me to tell me why use of your product shouldn’t continue past 2 hours? [I probably won’t heed the reason unless it’s a life or death warning: I love this product that much!] 2. Please feel free to post my letter in your testimonials, if you ever decide to post such customer comments.


Slower still are theta waves. Theta is best known as the brain wave state of dreaming sleep, but it is also associated with a number of other beneficial states, including increased creativity, some kinds of superlearning, increased memory abilities, visionary experiences, and what are called integrative experiences (where we make broadly-based positive changes in the way we see ourselves, others, or certain life situations).

In all professionally produced meditation programs, you train your brain gradually. That is how you successfully develop. Just like training the body, you progress gradually. This is the key. In BrainAscend you start with level 1. Each track is 30 minutes.  Use it once per day for 30 or 60 minutes at a time (once or twice in a row. Use repeat/loop function in your player) or twice per day for 30 minutes at a time. You should use every level for at least 2-3 months before moving to the next. The exception is level 1 which is an introductory level which you can use for a week or so. After that time, if you can repeatedly remain fully aware on your current level without falling asleep (even if playing it twice in a row) you can move on to the next level. Until then you should continue on your current level. Listen with closed eyes, either sitting up or laying down.

“…humans have always been intrigued by the possibilities for influencing mental functioning that emerge from combining rhythmic sound and rhythmic light stimulation. Ancient rituals for entering trance states often involved both rhythmic sounds in the form of drum beats, clapping, or chanting and flickering lights produced by candles, torches, bonfires, or long lines of human bodies passing before the fire and chopping the light into mesmerizing rhythmic flashes. From Greek plays to Western opera, our most popular entertainment forms have made use of combinations of lights and sounds. Some composers, such as the visionary Scriabin, actually created music intended to be experienced in combination with rhythmic light displays.”


Jump up ^ Trost W. and Vuilleumier P., Rhythmic entrainment as a mechanism for emotion induction by music: a neurophysiological perspective. In The Emotional Power of Music: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Musical Arousal, Expression, and Social Control, Cochrane T., Fantini B., and Scherer K. R., (Eds.), Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press; 2013, pp213–225.
×