What I really like about iAwake is their standalone offerings. They produce quite a few audio pieces that are geared toward specific brainwave targets and desired results. These individual products aren't progression - based (you can listen to whatever tracks you want whenever you want), so there's no lengthy investment of your time involved. Also they're way cheaper (around $30-$50 depending on the product). In addition to manipulating brainwaves with sound, they pride themselves on their patented Biofield tech (look them up for more info).
Delta (3hz – 0.2hz) – Deep, dreamless sleep. Intuition. Empathy. Brainwave expert Judith Pennington calls it the doorway to Universal Consciousness and “A radar that scans the environment and psychically picks up information and energy.” According to British physicist C. Maxwell Cade “There have been reports that delta waves appear at the onset of paranormal phenomena.” (More information can be found in Cade’s book The Awakened Mind)
The basic idea behind the Laxman light and sound technology is that the gentle pulses of light can lead one to the state of mind associated with that particular frequency range. The various pre-programmed “sessions” found in the Laxman mind machine can be used for different purposes, including meditation, stress reduction, accelerated learning, restful sleep, increased creativity, and goal setting.
How brainwave entrainment works is quite simple. A tone or beat is overlayed into a track (usually with nature sounds or calming music) that pulses on and off at a specific rate. The frequency of that rate is matched by the brain, thus leading it to produce brainwaves that correspond with that particular frequency. The specific frequency range determines the brainwave produced (ie: alpha, theta, delta, gamma). For example, if the beat is pulsing on or off at a rate of 7hz, your brain will produce brainwaves at the frequency of 7hz, which are theta waves.
The functional role of neural oscillations is still not fully understood;[6] however they have been shown to correlate with emotional responses, motor control, and a number of cognitive functions including information transfer, perception, and memory.[7][8][9] Specifically, neural oscillations, in particular theta activity, are extensively linked to memory function, and coupling between theta and gamma activity is considered to be vital for memory functions, including episodic memory.[10][11][12]
×