Initially the children were entrained to a mu-alpha rhythm (7 to 9 Hz) to decrease theta waves. After the initial mu-rhythm entrainment, they entrained SMR-beta waves for 22 minute sessions. The results as interpreted by TOVA demonstrated significant improvements in: inattentiveness, impulsivity, and variability. Teachers and parents also reported behavioral improvements among the children. Using the right brainwave entrainment protocol may be a potential Adderall alternative for those with attentional deficits.
Brain Sync audio programs deliver pure and precisely tuned sound frequencies to the brain to drive brain activity into high level states of mind. These are brain states known as Alpha for heightened creativity and deep relaxation; Beta for high focus and concentration; Theta for meditation, insight and memory; Delta for deep sleep and healing; and Gamma to increase cognition and improve IQ.

The main gist of brainwave entrainment audios, without getting too technical here, is that they effortlessly guide one’s brain (when listened to with stereo headphones) into a specifically targeted state, as designated by the creator of the audio. They are able to alter your brainwave states through the use of specific audio frequencies, and specific beats-the most common of which being binaural beats (though there are other types of beats being used as well).  When one frequency is played into one ear- let’s say 1115 Hz- and a slightly different frequency is played into the other-say 1125 Hz- the brain is forced to reconcile the two, and creates its own “phantom” frequency that is the difference between the two- in this case 10 Hz.  Not only does this allow the brain to be led into specific brainwave states, but it also allows the two hemispheres of the brain to synchronize with each other, stimulating and promoting whole-brain functioning.
Neural oscillations are rhythmic or repetitive electrochemical activity in the brain and central nervous system. Such oscillations can be characterized by their frequency, amplitude and phase. Neural tissue can generate oscillatory activity driven by mechanisms within individual neurons, as well as by interactions between them. They may also adjust frequency to synchronize with the periodic vibration of external acoustic or visual stimuli.[3]
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