Depression: Currently there is no substantial evidence to support the idea that brainwave entrainment treats depression in adults. Some evidence goes as far as to suggest that the wrong entrainment protocol (e.g. slow wave stimulation) may actually increase certain measures of depression. Stimulation of delta and/or theta, will likely worsen the condition and alpha is unlikely to have an effect.

Now next point to make here is that many of the other promised benefits of brainwave entrainment stem from this basic foundation.  For example, it has been said that listening to brainwave entrainment resets the brain’s sodium/potassium ratio, greatly decreasing mental fatigue, and improving the transporting of positive neurochemicals between brain cells.  This promise rests on the fact that it has been shown that this occurs while one is in the theta state. Therefore, the answer would be that yes, because these audios do lead one’s brain into the theta state, then it follows that they would promote the resetting of the brain’s sodium potassium ratio.

One of the most fascinating and beneficial things about Delta brainwaves is their ability to stimulate the release of anti-aging hormones in the body, such as HGH (human growth hormone). Increased melatonin levels are also common in this state, and regular visits to Delta have also been shown to decrease cortisol levels. (Cortisol is a hormone that is released during stressful situations, that has been linked with the aging process.) In a nutshell, Delta brainwaves are very healthy, and until now have only been accessible to us during deep sleep.


Other entrainment methods sometimes used include autopan modulation that moves sound in an 180º arc to create a desired tone. Harmonic box entrainment, invented by James Mann, uses a layering of binaural and monaural tones that alternate between ears, requiring headphones. Sound modulation and filtering, amplitude modulation, and pitch panning use diverse sounds to create rhythmic pulses matched to the desired brainwave frequency. 
While originally brainwave entrainment was achieved by using pure tones of sound, it is now possible to take these tones and blend them with music, rhythms, and natural sounds, such as the sounds of flowing water, bird sounds, or waves lapping on a beach, creating extended tracts of varied and intriguing brainwave entrainment music for everyday use.
Now next point to make here is that many of the other promised benefits of brainwave entrainment stem from this basic foundation.  For example, it has been said that listening to brainwave entrainment resets the brain’s sodium/potassium ratio, greatly decreasing mental fatigue, and improving the transporting of positive neurochemicals between brain cells.  This promise rests on the fact that it has been shown that this occurs while one is in the theta state. Therefore, the answer would be that yes, because these audios do lead one’s brain into the theta state, then it follows that they would promote the resetting of the brain’s sodium potassium ratio.

Altered states of consciousness: In as early as 1987 it was discovered that photic stimulation at specific frequencies produced an altered state of consciousness. An extremely small study with just 4 individuals involved photic stimulation at 6 Hz, 10 Hz, and 18 Hz. The results were reported to have altered their conscious awareness. This really isn’t that surprising to anyone that’s used brainwave entrainment therapy.
The phenomena of brainwave entrainment was first described in the scientific literature in 1973 by Gerald Oster in results published in an article in Scientific American entitled, “Auditory Beats in the Brain”. He showed that a specific brainwave could be induced when a person heard two separate, but closely related, sound frequencies, one in each ear. He discovered that when the frequencies heard by each ear differed by about 10 hertz, the brainwave pattern of the person hearing the sound would synchronize to the difference between the two frequencies. For example, if the person heard a 410 hertz sound in one ear and a 400 hertz sound in the other ear, their brainwaves would stabilize at the difference between the two, or 10 hertz. This technique is called binaural beats, and it is a fundamental principle of brainwave entrainment methods.
Creativity: Measuring “creativity” is likely subjective, but many people stuck in a certain dominant brain wave may benefit creatively from shifting the brain wave dominance. Someone who has excess beta waves may fail to relax enough to access certain (potential) creative properties associated with increased alpha waves. Similarly someone stuck in a slow wave state may benefit creatively from increasing beta waves.
You may already have a good feel for where each of the different brainwave states takes you, and know intuitively what will work for you the best on a day-to-day basis with your meditation practice. If you are a little fuzzy about the differences between the brainwave states, however, and would like to have a really clear, visceral sense of what each state does for you and how they resonate with you physically, mentally, and emotionally, one way you can find out is to listen to Harmonic … [Read more...]

Delta brainwaves have the slowest frequencies, ranging between 0.1 and 4 hertz, and these are the brainwave states associated with deep sleep, trance states, and unconsciousness. Few people can remain awake during delta brainwaves states, although this state is recorded in awake infants between ages of three months and one year and also in babies just before birth. Delta waves are also linked with increased production of HGH, DHEA, and the neuro-transmitter serotonin.
The Frequency following response (FFR), also referred to as Frequency Following Potential (FFP), is a specific response to hearing sound and music, by which neural oscillations adjust their frequency to match the rhythm of auditory stimuli. The use of sound with intent to influence cortical brainwave frequency is called auditory driving,[39][40] by which frequency of neural oscillation is 'driven' to entrain with that of the rhythm of a sound source.[41][42]
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