It was a few months after the birth of our second child that I came to truly understand the effects of long-term sleep deprivation. Constantly waking up at 1:00 or 3:00 a.m. soon turned daily life into a hazy blur. I'd often find myself lying in bed, anticipating the next round of crying, or later in the night, I'd be tossing and turning for ages after being woken up. It's no fun whatsoever to drag yourself out of bed every morning with dark circles under your eyes. During this time, it became … [Read more...]

So, I tried those frequencies. And after listening to the 1st one (High Beta to Gamma, Isochronic tones: 18HZ ramped up to 40HZ within 20 minutes) – I immediately stood up and started organizing! (Something that I kept forgetting to do!) Overall, I’ve found that isochronic tones & monaural beats are more immediately effective than binaural beats, though they are still good.

“…humans have always been intrigued by the possibilities for influencing mental functioning that emerge from combining rhythmic sound and rhythmic light stimulation. Ancient rituals for entering trance states often involved both rhythmic sounds in the form of drum beats, clapping, or chanting and flickering lights produced by candles, torches, bonfires, or long lines of human bodies passing before the fire and chopping the light into mesmerizing rhythmic flashes. From Greek plays to Western opera, our most popular entertainment forms have made use of combinations of lights and sounds. Some composers, such as the visionary Scriabin, actually created music intended to be experienced in combination with rhythmic light displays.”
Stress: In one randomized controlled trial with 108 participants, a single session of alpha and delta stimulation resulted in significantly less anxiety in surgical patients. Another session of theta stimulation resulted in improvement in certain measures of stress. Stimulation with certain frequencies of alpha and beta were reported to provide the most significant benefit for those who are stressed.

* We made the decision in this update to return Brain Wave to a Portrait-Only App. We know some people will miss the Landscape UI, but we did this to focus on the Brainwave Entrainment and Audio experience, and to prepare for new devices and screen sizes. Maintaining and testing portrait and landscape layouts for iOS 5-8, HD&SD, and 3 Aspect Ratios had become the single most time consuming part of our development and testing, and soon there will be even more. 90% of our dev and testing time was spent tilting iPads and iPhones of different sizes and different iOS versions, tweaking code that had nothing to do with brainwave entrainment--the reason I and others use this app everyday. Once the new Aspect Ratio devices come out and we have time to test with them, then maybe Landscape will make a comeback on the iPad.


Brainwave entrainment can enhance physical, emotional and mental healing. As a matter of fact, medical experts make use of different frequencies to assist patients who suffer from depression, attention deficit disorders, alcoholism, autism, poor self esteem as well as drug addiction. You could also make use of brainwave frequencies to alleviate migraines and headaches.
Altered states of consciousness: In as early as 1987 it was discovered that photic stimulation at specific frequencies produced an altered state of consciousness. An extremely small study with just 4 individuals involved photic stimulation at 6 Hz, 10 Hz, and 18 Hz. The results were reported to have altered their conscious awareness. This really isn’t that surprising to anyone that’s used brainwave entrainment therapy.
All brainwave frequencies are useful and beneficial at certain times – there is no brainwave that is intrinsically better than another. However, by deliberately choosing to attain a particular brainwave state, a corresponding mental state can be brought about at the same time. For example, a working person who has been in an overly alert beta brainwave pattern for many hours can quickly shift their mind and body into a relaxed state by listening to a few minutes of brainwave entrainment music for inducing alpha or theta brainwaves.
Deep relaxation is a major benefit resulting from the brain’s cortical frequency following response. By selecting the desired rate the brain, via the frequency following response, will tend to mimic the rate it is exposed to and thus enter that brainwave state. This helps to explain why this technology can produce benefits commonly found with meditation. One of the most valuable benefits of consistent  brainwave entrainment is that we are able to experience and recognize the various states of consciousness. With practice we can learn how to re-create these states.
Gamma waves are the fastest brainwave frequency range. Gamma brain waves are believed to link and process information from all other parts of the brain. A high amount of gamma wave activity in the brain is associated with intelligence, compassion, focus and feelings of happiness. High levels of gamma brain waves have also been linked to improved memory and an increased sensitivity to sensory input. Low amounts of gamma brainwave activity have been linked to learning difficulties, poor memory and impaired mental processing.

If you’ve used brainwave entrainment and experienced any benefits, feel free to share your experience in the comments section below. Be sure to discuss why you believe the entrainment was effective and/or whether you think it could’ve been a placebo effect. I’ve played around with the products and feel as if they are great for relaxation enhancement, inducing a temporary perceptual change (i.e. altered state of consciousness), and arousal reduction.
The activity of neurons generate electric currents; and the synchronous action of neural ensembles in the cerebral cortex, comprising large numbers of neurons, produce macroscopic oscillations. These phenomena can be monitored and graphically documented by an electroencephalogram (EEG). The electroencephalographic representations of those oscillations are typically denoted by the term 'brainwaves' in common parlance.[4][5]
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