It is important to take an objective look at published scientific evidence to determine whether brainwave entrainment is an effective treatment for certain conditions and/or symptoms. Most preliminary evidence suggests that while the technology will not cure any condition, it may be a successful adjunct treatment when used carefully with the proper protocol.
Mood: While brainwave entrainment may not be a great option for depression, particularly in the slower frequency ranges, beta entrainment may improve certain measures of mood. Additionally it is important to consider the fact that many people experience detrimental changes in mood as a result of heightened stress and anxiety. Since brainwave entrainment has been shown to improve stress and relaxation, overstressed individuals may experience a simultaneous mood improvement.

Discovered by Austrian Psychiatrist Hans Berger in 1908, Alpha brainwaves cycle 8 to 13 times per second, a good bit slower than beta brainwaves. While considered a part of a group of brainwaves, the Alpha brainwave has one distinct trait that makes it stand out from its siblings – it appears and disappears while going through our brain. Sometimes alpha waves are present, sometimes they are not. The disappearance of the Alpha brainwave usually occurs when someone is asleep or experiences heightened emotions such as fear or anger. This brainwave only appears whenever a person is awake and relaxed, a one-of-a-kind distinction among other types of brainwaves. 
Theta brainwaves are next highest in frequency above delta and are especially important for many people using brainwave entrainment and meditation because theta waves are at a threshold, forming a link between wakefulness and the subconscious mind. Theta waves bridge between our awake self and the creative and insightful understandings from below our conscious awareness, and while they are not common in awake adults, they are normative for children under 13 years old. 
How brainwave entrainment works is quite simple. A tone or beat is overlayed into a track (usually with nature sounds or calming music) that pulses on and off at a specific rate. The frequency of that rate is matched by the brain, thus leading it to produce brainwaves that correspond with that particular frequency. The specific frequency range determines the brainwave produced (ie: alpha, theta, delta, gamma). For example, if the beat is pulsing on or off at a rate of 7hz, your brain will produce brainwaves at the frequency of 7hz, which are theta waves.
Admitted, I haven’t listened to all the tracks yet, but while listening to the demo alone over the course of a month-and-a-half I, too, had a transcendental experience that was amazing! So I determined pretty quickly to save the money and buy your product, even though I really can’t afford it. Yes, over the last 3 years meditation has become that important to me.
Also, don’t you think that the inherent hemispheric synchronization using binaural beats might be a positive benefit within itself? While it’s true that the huge majority of us use both sides of our brains most of the time, it’s also true that many of us are a bit polarized to one side or the other in general, or when doing a particular kind of activity or focus. I’ve found stimulating a more equally and consistently whole brain activity has it’s own benefits other than the entrainment aspect.
I came to the conclusion that it is not necessary, from what I’ve read in the books of numerous spiritual teachers as well as from my own experiences, where some of my most profound leaps in consciousness actually came when I wasn’t struggling. Although there were times when I had to put forward effort, my meditation practice and my spiritual practice really seemed to gain momentum when my heart and my devotion became so deeply engaged that it was no longer merely a discipline, but a profound love affair that was moving me along. Some of my biggest leaps in growth actually came about almost effortlessly.

Neural oscillations are rhythmic or repetitive electrochemical activity in the brain and central nervous system. Such oscillations can be characterized by their frequency, amplitude and phase. Neural tissue can generate oscillatory activity driven by mechanisms within individual neurons, as well as by interactions between them. They may also adjust frequency to synchronize with the periodic vibration of external acoustic or visual stimuli.[3]
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