Given that brainwaves control and connect such a vast range of human experience from thought to feelings to actions, it is easy to see how the deliberate control of brainwaves can affect mood, behaviors, motivation, and even physical health. Brainwave entrainment is a safe, simple, and scientifically proven method for quickly guiding the brain into a beneficial brainwave frequency to facilitate healthy sleep, lower stress, heal emotional problems, and improve physical health.

I am fortunate to be working with Deepak Chopra, M.D., and Dr. Rudy Tanzi, co-authors of the bestselling book Super Brain, on a technology called Brain Wave Entrainment. Deepak is very well known, but Rudy is an amazingly interesting person as well. He is the Kennedy Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School and Vice-Chair of Neurology at Mass General Hospital. Rudy co-discovered three of the four original Alzheimer's genes and today runs the Alzheimer's Genome Project. He also plays the keyboards, including, at times, for Aerosmith. He is kind of a real life "Buckaroo Banzai."

* There are a lot of new features in this release so please take a moment to review the updated help for information on how to use them. As always, if you have any issues or suggestions please drop us an email at support@banzailabs.com so we can respond with any follow up questions we may have. We always try to incorporate user requests, and this update is packed with them, so please keep them coming and we hope you enjoy the update!

I’m kind of new to brainwave entrainment. So even though I might have been skeptic at first, my very first experience was rather surprising. I know, I’m probably among millions of people expressing the effects and benefits of brainwave enhancing auditory stimuli. But truth be told, if you have the right tone, the perfect serene place, and an unshakable determination? Then you’re on the right track. So I’d say? Give brainwave entrainment a try. You’re bound to feel the great benefits of these powerful, yet simple methods of mental boosters. Oh! Before I forget. Thank you for the interesting script mademoiselle. 🙂
3) Theta waves – these waves exist between 4 and 7 Hz. This state is commonly referred to as the dream or “twilight” state. Theta is associated with learning, memory, REM sleep and dreaming. Memory development is also enhanced while in this state. When in a theta brainwave state, memory is improved (especially long-term memory), and access to unconscious material, insights and creative ideas is increased.
That is a general assumption people make but there isn’t really much science to back it up. What we do know though is that isochronic tones are ineffective below 4hz, and possibly a bit higher. So for theta and delta entrainment you are best off with binaural beats. In my experience binaural beats will be very effective all the way up to around 40hz.
I first became aware of brainwave meditation programs  and brain waves when researching alternative methods for treating the bipolar disorder I had been unsuccessfully living with my entire adult life. I eventually learned a method of releasing difficult emotions on the spot, which I then practiced extensively, and consequently found it easier and even desirable to meditate for fairly lengthy periods of time. Though I took up meditation as a serious daily practice and experienced many undeniable benefits, I nonetheless intermittently experienced life-debilitating bouts of mania and severe depression, often resulting in chaotic mixed states and an inability to maintain daily social functions. During these times, it became nearly impossible to sit in meditation.
In 1984 medical researcher Dr. Gene W. Brockopp published a paper making several conclusions of audio and visual entrainment (AVE). Such conclusions were that hemispheric synchronization caused by AVE is related to increased intellectual functioning, practiced use of AVE overtime leads to a cumulative effect, and AVE may result in the recovery of early childhood experiences.
Neural oscillations are rhythmic or repetitive electrochemical activity in the brain and central nervous system. Such oscillations can be characterized by their frequency, amplitude and phase. Neural tissue can generate oscillatory activity driven by mechanisms within individual neurons, as well as by interactions between them. They may also adjust frequency to synchronize with the periodic vibration of external acoustic or visual stimuli.[3]
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