The objectives and inclusion criteria of the review were clear. Relevant sources were searched for studies, although the restriction to published studies in English meant that the review was prone to publication and language biases. The authors did not state whether steps were taken to minimise the risk of bias and error in the processes of study selection and data extraction (for example, by having more than one reviewer independently make decisions). The authors mentioned which studies were blinded, but it did not appear that study validity was systematically assessed, which made it difficult to judge the reliability of the review findings. The decision to combine studies by narrative synthesis appeared appropriate given the strong clinical heterogeneity between the studies, but the authors failed to quantify the size or statistical significance of the findings reported. The evidence presented appeared to justify the authors’ conclusions that further research was justified, but in view of the dearth of good-quality evidence and problems with methodology and reporting in the review, the conclusions regarding efficacy did not appear reliable.
I haven’t seen any research relating to using brainwave entrainment/isochronic tones and bodybuilding, so I’m afraid I don’t know how effective it would be to help with that. I have a few different tracks for increasing energy but I recommend this 1-hour track, which would fit better than my shorter tracks for a training session: https://www.mindamend.com/shop/energy-and-motivation/high-energy-builder/. The effects from these tracks are mainly felt while you listen to them, so I recommend listening to the energy tracks while you are training/lifting weights etc. I don’t currently have any tracks to help trigger the testosterone hormone.
The most common way to use a brainwave entrainment is for a short-term benefit, to help guide your brain into a particular mental state at the time you need it.  In a similar way to how you might take a sleeping pill before bed to help you get to sleep, or maybe drink some coffee or an energy drink to help wake you up and give you a boost of energy.
hey thanks for wonderful ideas you posted. am kinda new to this whole idea and i was wondering if you could tell me with what types of audio tracks should i begin with. or if you could suggest some trusted and effective you tube videos, i would appreciate it. guys i will post my experiences when i have tried this thing. Thank you very much for your help Maya.
When I am using equisync I feel kind of like it is “pushing me” – I guess this is the right way to say it- to achieve better results, which I really like. I fall asleep quickly, and sleep all night and even wake up before my alarm goes off. I feel noticeably calm during the workday- which is very helpful for what I do. I really like the warm feeling (my whole body gets really warm during my equisync meditation sessions) and I feel kind of like Im floating while listening. The soothing rainfall is also very nice.
Theta stimulation: There appears to be no benefit associated with using theta stimulation for cognitive functioning, mood, or stress relief. While theta may be a useful way to induce sleep or alter your state of consciousness, there really isn’t much science supporting entrainment in this particular range for most purposes. Photic stimulation of theta between 5 Hz and 7 Hz can be useful for headaches.

There are primarily three ways to elicit the frequency following response through an audio: binaural beats, monaural beats, and isochronic tones.  Binaural beats was the first method to be discovered, and has been used since the 80’s, after being first made known and popular by Robert Monroe of the Monroe Institute (the institute is still around today, though Mr. Monroe has passed away).  Binaural beats basically work in this way: one specific frequency/beat is played in one ear, let’s say, 1115 hz., while one slightly different frequency is played in the other at the same time, let’s say, 1120 hz.  What the brain will naturally do while exposed to these two frequencies in either ear is create its own “phantom” beat, that is the difference between the two frequencies.  In this case, it would be 5 hz., which is the frequency of the theta brainwave state.  Therefore, your brain would be led into the theta state.  At the same time, your brain working to combine these frequencies also ends up synchronizing its two hemispheres, and functioning in a whole-brained fashion while the listener is using the audio.
One of the more fascinating aspects of what brainwave entrainment does, long-term, is the growing of your mental threshold, and your self-awareness.  I have been a participant of the Holosync Solution for several years, and its maker, Bill Harris, has gone to great lengths to explain why this technology does this.  Much of his research is based on the concept of Entropy and Open Systems, (an idea that nominated its discoverer for a nobel prize).  The brain being an open system, and the technology being a specific type of entropy, this technology has been shown to help the brain reorganize itself at a “higher level” through the growth of new neural pathways. This basically means that 
With brain wave entrainment technology, changing brain wave states is an instantaneous and effortless process. The 'periodic stimulus' can be sound, vibrations and/or light. We have found that we get the best results with blinking lights which are experienced through closed eyelids. This is only problematic for people with existing diagnosis of photo-induced epilepsy, as blinking lights can induce a seizure in them. The programs are enhanced with Deepak Chopra doing the narration along with holographic sound effects and original music composed and performed by Rudy Tanzi.
Brainwave entrainment represents a way of using technology to take our meditation and our spiritual practices into territory that has previously been very difficult, if not impossible, for us to venture into. My inspiration for creating the Profound Meditation Program 3.0 was not about just adding binaural beats or isochronic tones to music, using conventional audio entrainment methods to create brainwave patterns, and say, “Hey, this is the next big thing!” To me, it is all about what we can do—even if it’s pulling from way outside of the box—to enable such a profound coherence that we can go to meditative depths that have been practically out of reach. With the Profound Meditation Program 3.0, I wanted to do something that hadn’t been done before, taking the technology to the next level.
So let’s start with the basics, and we can move on from there. An easier way to understand brainwave entrainment would be to think about how your brain gets entrained in real life, without the use of any technology. Have you ever heard a song on the radio that stuck into your mind throughout the day and maybe even the next one? Now think about a repeating sound, like the ticking of a clock – simply listening to it your brain starts producing alpha waves that match that tick-tack sound. Or have you ever been at a meeting when you immediately felt sleepy? That is because the majority of people in the room were feeling that same way and your brain simply matched the brain wave patterns they have been emanating. We can go on exemplifying this phenomenon, but the main point is that our brain is altering and adapting in direct response to what we hear, think, and see.
Brainwaves, or neural oscillations, share the fundamental constituents with acoustic and optical waves, including frequency, amplitude and periodicity. Consequently, Huygens' discovery precipitated inquiry[citation needed] into whether or not the synchronous electrical activity of cortical neural ensembles might not only alter in response to external acoustic or optical stimuli but also entrain or synchronize their frequency to that of a specific stimulus.[16][17][18][19]
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