Because each track is specifically aimed at attaining a certain outcome, you can pick exactly which track you want for what you want to do. This is great for beginners because you can start off with some simple tracks such as Instant Energy Boost or Endorphin Release. And then if you find you like them you can choose some of their more hardcore stuff (such as Lucid Dreaming or Shaman Consciousness).
Hi Et, In all the feedback and studies I’ve read and looked into over the years, I’ve seen lots of feedback from people talking about how they don’t like the sound of the tones, or they find them irritating in some way. Unfortunately, there doesn’t seem to be any particular reason why one person likes it and the next doesn’t. It’s a bit like normal music, one person’s sweet symphony is another person pneumatic drill. It’s common for people to find it weird and maybe annoying at first, which is how I felt in the beginning. But usually after a few listens you can start to get used to it and appreciate the sound, and especially the feeling it gives you. Personally, I think it can help if you try to embrace the sound, psychologically speaking beforehand. It can also help to have the sound playing at a very low volume, to begin with, then building it up as you get more used to it.
If the further development of consciousness and awareness is your ultimate goal, there really is no substitute for actual meditation, of which many techniques are the result of thousands of years of human endeavor and accumulated knowledge and experience. Sure, it's not as easy as putting on headphones and pushing a button, but achieving authentic inner peace and relief from the stresses of human existence will mean so much more to you when earned through the time-tested route of traditional meditation. (Plus, once you learn to actually meditate, you can do it anywhere anytime without having to rely on being plugged in to something!)
I’m sorry to hear you’re having these troubles. First off, I disagree with whoever told you it was a good idea to listen to 6 subliminals a day. I suppose I would need more context to better understand. Are these binaural beats or brainwave entrainment audios? If so you are definitely listening too much, and can harm yourself (just as the article mentions above from over-doing it). Even if they are not brainwave entrainment audios, I cannot imagine it is effective or the best idea to listen to so much so often. I would pick one subject that correlates to the most important goal for you and stick with it until you have achieved it. Remember to steer clear of that tempting idea of getting “all that you want for nothing”. Even subliminals are a tool. You still have to use the tool to do the work.
Business executive and radio producer Robert Monroe started experimenting with brainwave entrainment and has a series of powerful out of body experiences using it. In 1971 he published his cult classic “Journeys Out of the Body” sharing his experiences. He later created one of the first audio entrainment companies called Hemi Sync, alongside the Monroe Institute of Applied Sciences.
The brain is composed of millions of specialized cells called neurons. Neurons send signals to other neurons using electro-chemical messengers called neuro-transmitters that attach to receiving sites located on the neurons themselves. There is a space between the end of the neuron and the receptor called the synaptic gap. As neuro-transmitter chemicals move across this gap, a small electrical charge is created. 
Robert Monroe, a radio producer and executive published a popular book called Journeys Out of the Body about his out-of-body experiences when using brainwave entrainment. He later founded an original brainwave entrainment audio company, Hemi Sync. In 1981, the book Mega Brain by Michael Hutchison brought brainwave entrainment information, techniques, and terminology into the popular press.

There are primarily three ways to elicit the frequency following response through an audio: binaural beats, monaural beats, and isochronic tones.  Binaural beats was the first method to be discovered, and has been used since the 80’s, after being first made known and popular by Robert Monroe of the Monroe Institute (the institute is still around today, though Mr. Monroe has passed away).  Binaural beats basically work in this way: one specific frequency/beat is played in one ear, let’s say, 1115 hz., while one slightly different frequency is played in the other at the same time, let’s say, 1120 hz.  What the brain will naturally do while exposed to these two frequencies in either ear is create its own “phantom” beat, that is the difference between the two frequencies.  In this case, it would be 5 hz., which is the frequency of the theta brainwave state.  Therefore, your brain would be led into the theta state.  At the same time, your brain working to combine these frequencies also ends up synchronizing its two hemispheres, and functioning in a whole-brained fashion while the listener is using the audio.


Thanks for the reply. I am now clearer on ‘what’ is heard. Can you expand or point me in direction ..a bit more about ‘pitch frequency’ and frequency spoken about and what exactly is the difference ..and how we use the higher pitch frequencies to ‘hear’ or become aware of them? Would you only pick up the low freq on a EEG?. sorry for being pedantic ..it still does not clear up split isochronics and possibly creating same situation as binaural beats..

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3) Theta waves – these waves exist between 4 and 7 Hz. This state is commonly referred to as the dream or “twilight” state. Theta is associated with learning, memory, REM sleep and dreaming. Memory development is also enhanced while in this state. When in a theta brainwave state, memory is improved (especially long-term memory), and access to unconscious material, insights and creative ideas is increased.

Chronic fatigue: Subjective improvements in energy level may be reported by those who increase stimulatory beta and gamma waves. Fast waves tend to be associated with higher levels of arousal. Low arousal is associated with chronic fatigue and may be exacerbated by slow brain waves (e.g. theta and delta). As of now there aren’t any studies that have analyzed various protocols for their effect on a person’s energy or arousal.


Our brains follow cues from outside stimuli, and brainwaves mimic the pulse rates of the sounds we expose it to. So, by creating tracks that pulse sound waves at a desired frequency, we can effectively coax our brain into that state. In layman's terms; by listening to some strange sounding brainwave frequency audios, we can literally slip our brain into a state of feeling calm, alert, focused, energized... and the list goes on. Pretty cool, right!?

Hi Pajaro. It is difficult to pinpoint exactly why and they probably didn’t want to make assumptions without conclusive evidence. Do you suffer from ADD? Or do you struggle to focus? The reason I ask is because of this: “Peak performers’ decrease Delta waves when high focus and peak performance is required. However, most individuals diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder, naturally increase rather than decrease Delta activity when trying to focus. The inappropriate Delta response often severely restricts the ability to focus and maintain attention. It is as if the brain is locked into a perpetual drowsy state”. This extract… Read more »
The activity of neurons generate electric currents; and the synchronous action of neural ensembles in the cerebral cortex, comprising large numbers of neurons, produce macroscopic oscillations. These phenomena can be monitored and graphically documented by an electroencephalogram (EEG). The electroencephalographic representations of those oscillations are typically denoted by the term 'brainwaves' in common parlance.[4][5]
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