Binaural beats can be experienced in any float session you book.  To this point in your floating practice you may, or may not, have heard of – or perhaps already experienced – binaural beats and their effective use of being a unique option/tool to listen to while in (or out of) the tank. But what exactly are binaural beats, how do they work and why choose to listen to them? All good questions, so here we go:


In 1956, the famous neuroscientist W. Gray Walter published the results of studying thousands of test subjects using photic stimulation, showing their change in mental and emotional states. He also learned that photic stimulation not only altered brainwaves, but that these changes were occurring in areas of the brain outside of vision. In Walter’s words:
Generally, the established brain entrainment technology has been to use various static levels, lowering the carrier frequency of the binaural signals over time. By doing this, you basically increase the resonant power of the carrier frequency to resonate more deeply with the resonant frequency of the brain and the nervous system. This process pushes the nervous system over time. The limitation I find with this system is that it takes a static approach, in the sense that it gives the nervous system the same degree of stimulation day in and day out. The idea here is that if you keep whamming your nervous system with the same stimulation on a daily basis, it will eventually kick in and learn. Then your nervous system and your brain will jump to the next level.
Thanks, this was the kind of article I was looking for. I most have gotten over excited as I read a post about a guy who had major success with 40hz binaural beats. I wanted to make my own experiment, but I see now that I will need to continue my research and gather more background information. Maybe one should have his physiology examined? In order to have a professional opinion on whether or not it will be altered or damaged by use of brainwave entrainment (Maybe you happen to be a very vulnerable individual). Getting trustworthy guidance from an experienced source would also be nice 🙂
At the beginning of May, I decided to change over to EquiSync because it’s much cheaper and let me experience the deeper levels sooner. At best, my blood pressure has been down to 66 and after cups of tea and food, back up to 76-80 which is regarded as acceptable. I was able to achieve these wonderful results in less than 6 months of daily practice of meditation using audio-beat technology.
The effects are strongest while you are listening to the tones because your brainwaves are synchronized and tuned into the frequency range you desire at that time.  After you've stopped listening the effects can still linger for a while afterwards.  The timescale will vary from person to person and be affected by what you do after you've stopped listening.
I’ve been on the brainwave vibe for about 6 months now, & I’m really diggin’ some results! I find that there are certain frequencies, I guess, that feel right and comfortable to my mind; I also find that I can physically feel the area of my brain that “pure” (no frikkn ocean waves) tones are affecting as I listen to them. This occurs the moment I hear the sound. Kinda like energy, a brain tickle. Spooky & awesome!!

So I began to look at other instances in which the nervous system is being stimulated on a daily basis and discovered that sports science has a lot to teach us about this. Whether you are practicing yoga, meditation, using brainwave entrainment, or working out, it’s all pushing the nervous system. One of the things that sports science teaches us is that the nervous system waxes and wanes like a sine wave in its capacity to recover from, and grow from, the stimulation we give it every day. Static levels of stimulation, where you’re getting the same smack every day, day in and day out, do not allow for the fact that there are times when the nervous system is at its peak to handle the stimulation, and there are other times when the nervous system is in its trough, or valley period, when it is harder for it to recover from stimulation.
Neural oscillations are rhythmic or repetitive electrochemical activity in the brain and central nervous system. Such oscillations can be characterized by their frequency, amplitude and phase. Neural tissue can generate oscillatory activity driven by mechanisms within individual neurons, as well as by interactions between them. They may also adjust frequency to synchronize with the periodic vibration of external acoustic or visual stimuli.[3]
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